NANPA News* highlights NWNL and Alison M. Jones

*North American Nature Photography Association newsletter. I’ve always enjoyed water. I grew up on a small rural stream with frogs, moss, trout, rocks and fog. Years later, copiloting over sub-Sahara Africa, I saw clearly that where there was no water, there was no life. Thus, No Water No Life ® (NWNL) became the title of…

An elephant’s memory of water

The African savannah elephant is the largest land mammal in the world. In folklore, elephants are known for not forgetting. For the African savannah elephant, memory is a tool for surviving challenges that may come intermittently over decades. Long-term memory tends to be vested in the older females, called matriarchs, without which the herd could…

NWNL Pointers on Stayin’ COOL

Sparked by a blog by John Cronin, Hudson Riverkeeper (1983-2000), Founding Director/CEO of Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries, and now Senior Fellow for Environmental Affairs at pace Academy. As John Cronin wrote: “According to Stan Cox, author of the 2010 book “Losing Our Cool,” air conditioning in the US has a global-warming impact equivalent…

“Do unto those downstream as you would have those upstream do unto you.” ― Wendell Berry Read a related article: The Race to Save Ethiopians Damned by the Dam, by Al Mariam   - Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

How Wolves Change Rivers

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysa5OBhXz-Q This video, How Wolves Change Rivers, explains the “balance-of-nature“ phenomena scientists call a "trophic cascade.” NWNL also documented this on its Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem Expedition in 2008. When wolves were reintroduced into Yellowstone National Park, it had a very beneficial impact on the ecosystem and on water flows. Although the video mislabels the elk…