The Serengeti’s Meyasi Mollel

Today, NWNL Director Alison M Jones will give a joint presentation in New York City with Serengeti Preservation Foundation Director, Meyasi Mollel. They will discuss Africa's Serengeti-Mara Ecosystem, its threats, and a variety of solutions to protect the wildlife and ecosystems within this renowned "8th Wonder of the World." Zebras about to cross the Mara…

Women as Saviors of the Serengeti

Written by Meyasi Mollel.Images © Alison M Jones, unless otherwise noted. NWNL Director Alison Jones met Tanzania's Meyasi Meshilieck a year ago in Kenya, via NWNL's partner Serengeti Watch co-directors Boyd Norton and Dave Blanton. In her NWNL Interview with Meyasi, they discussed his views as a science educator in Tanzania and his passion for conservation. As…

Cape Buffalo, Bison and Water

By Bianca T. Esposito, NWNL Research Intern (Edited by Alison M.  Jones, NWNL Director) NWNL research intern Bianca T. Esposito is a senior at Syracuse University studying Biology and minoring in Economics. Her research this summer is on the intertwined relationships of biodiversity and our water resources. This is Bianca's second blog on Biodiversity for NWNL.…

White Nile River Basin Expedition – Uganda

This will be our first trip to Uganda’s White Nile River Basin, although we have already conducted two expeditions to Ethiopia’s Blue Nile. One third of Africa’s populations reside in and depend on the natural resources of the Nile River Basin. In Uganda, I will photograph the two White Nile tributaries, the Victoria Nile and the Albert Nile, and investigate conservation of forest and wetland habitats and ecosystems. To do this I will visit the following National Parks: Lake Mburu, Bwindi Impenetrable Forest, Lake Elizabeth, Kibale Forest, Murchison Falls and Kidepo Valley.

Funding the Mara River Expedition

I am diving in with our project's current challenge: EXPEDITION FUNDING! NWNL’s research, documentation and publications are based on its expeditions to North American and African case-study watersheds. By comparing approaches to freshwater issues and solutions in developed versus developing nations, NWNL distinguishes itself from most other organizations.